Virtual Development Server: Provide Docker images in docker registry for Oracle via Jenkins

This is a follow up to earlier Virtual Development Server: Provide Docker images in docker registry for Oracle XE Database and others.

We now try to automated build of all needed images as soon as Oracle GitHub Sources changed or we need to build our Vagrant VirtualBox again from scratch.

After we have already installed Jenkins we now install first some needed plugins.

After this we create our Jenkins pipeline via “New Item”.

Here is the script for the moment, later after we have it successfully tested and implemented all builds of images we need, we will put it in it’s own git repository and call it from there. The script is written in Pipeline Model Definition, a config-like syntax for defining Pipelines.

pipeline {
    agent label:'localhost_vagrant'
    stages {
        // Get the actual docker images sourcse from oracle git account
        stage('Get Sources') {
            steps {
                git url: 'https://github.com/oracle/docker-images.git'
            }
        }
        stage('Build Oracle Docker Images') {
            steps {
                parallel (
                    "Database XE 11.2.0.2" : {
                        dir('OracleDatabase/dockerfiles') {
                            // provide the downloaded source (via your oracle account) from the host
                            sh 'if [ ! -f 11.2.0.2/oracle-xe-11.2.0-1.0.x86_64.rpm.zip ]; then cp /software/Oracle/Database/oracle-xe-11.2.0-1.0.x86_64.rpm.zip 11.2.0.2/oracle-xe-11.2.0-1.0.x86_64.rpm.zip; fi'
                            // build the image
                            sh 'sudo ./buildDockerImage.sh  -v 11.2.0.2 -x'
                            // prepare the image for push to the local registry
                            sh 'docker tag oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe localhost:5000/oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe'
                            // push to the local registry
                            sh 'docker push localhost:5000/oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe'
                        }
                    },
                    "WebLogic 12.2.1.2" : {
                        // server-jre is required for Weblogic
                        dir('OracleJava/java-8') {
                            // provide the downloaded source (via your oracle account) from the host
                            sh 'if [ ! -f server-jre-8u111-linux-x64.tar.gz ]; then cp /software/Oracle/Java/server-jre-8u111-linux-x64.tar.gz server-jre-8u111-linux-x64.tar.gz; fi'
                            // build the image
                            sh 'sudo ./build.sh'
                            // prepare the image for push to the local registry
                            sh 'docker tag oracle/serverjre:8 localhost:5000/oracle/serverjre:8'
                            // push to the local registry
                            sh 'docker push localhost:5000/oracle/serverjre:8'
                        }
                        dir('OracleWebLogic/dockerfiles') {
                            // provide the downloaded source (via your oracle account) from the host
                            sh 'if [ ! -f 12.2.1.2/fmw_12.2.1.2.0_wls_Disk1_1of1.zip ]; then cp /software/Oracle/WebLogic/fmw_12.2.1.2.0_wls_Disk1_1of1.zip 12.2.1.2/fmw_12.2.1.2.0_wls_Disk1_1of1.zip; fi'
                            // build the image
                            sh 'sudo ./buildDockerImage.sh -v 12.2.1.2 -g'
                            // prepare the image for push to the local registry
                            sh 'docker tag oracle/weblogic:12.2.1.2-generic localhost:5000/oracle/weblogic:12.2.1.2-generic'
                            // push to the local registry
                            sh 'docker push localhost:5000/oracle/weblogic:12.2.1.2-generic'
                        }
                    }
                )
            }
        }
        stage('Cleanup') {
            steps {
                // clean virtualbox
                sh 'docker rmi --force localhost:5000/oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe'
                sh 'docker rmi --force oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe'
                sh 'docker rmi --force localhost:5000/oracle/weblogic:12.2.1.2-generic'
                sh 'docker rmi --force oracle/weblogic:12.2.1.2-generic'
                sh 'docker rmi --force localhost:5000/oracle/serverjre:8'
                sh 'docker rmi --force oracle/serverjre:8'
            }
        }

    }
}

We can wait now the 15 min poll time or start the job manually.

After an “vagrant halt / vagrant up” you can control in your browser, that the created images are persistent in the local docker registry:

docker_registry_persistent

Here you find the source code for this blog.

Here you find more about the topic “Virtual Development Server”.

That’s it.

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Virtual Development Server: Install Jenkins for Continuos Integration / Delivery / Deployment

For automation of all of my processes I need Jenkins in my development server.

First I had installed Jenkins as Docker container via Vagrant Docker provider. But with this architecture it was very complicated to create docker images and run Docker containers on the Docker host, in this case my Vagrant Virtualbox.

So for simplification I have decided to install Jenkins with the provisioning of the Vagrant Virtualbox via a shell provider in my Vagrantfile:

...
  # persistant storage for jenkins
  config.vm.synced_folder "C:\\shared\\virtual_storage\\jenkins_home", "/var/lib/jenkins", type: "nfs", owner: 994, group: 992, create: true
...
  # install jenkins
  config.vm.provision :shell, :path => "add_jenkins.sh"
...

First I map a shared folder of my Windows Host to the Vagrant Virtualbox to persist my Jenkins Configuration.
Then I install Jenkins via the shell script add_jenkins.sh.

sudo yum -y install java
sudo wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/jenkins.repo http://pkg.jenkins-ci.org/redhat-stable/jenkins.repo
sudo rpm --import https://jenkins-ci.org/redhat/jenkins-ci.org.key
sudo yum -y install jenkins
sudo sed -i -e 's/JENKINS_JAVA_OPTIONS="-Djava.awt.headless=true"/JENKINS_JAVA_OPTIONS="-Djava.awt.headless=true -Dmail.smtp.starttls.enable=true"/g' /etc/sysconfig/jenkins
sudo service jenkins start

Jenkins requires java, so I install it first. After that I get the latest Long-Term Support (LTS) repository, import it and install Jenkins from there. Then I do some configuration, which I need for my jobs and start Jenkins. An open issue is, that I have to restart Jenkins after Vagrant restart, because the shared folders are unfortunatly mounted after service starts.

After first install you have to enter the credential information from the filesystem as requested, all later installations use the persistent Jenkins configuration, so you can login and start from where you have left Jenkins.

unlock_jenkins

Here you find the source code for this blog.

Here you find more about the topic “Virtual Development Server”.

That’s it.

, , , , , , , ,

1 Comment

Fix “BEA-000394: Deadlock detected” for Weblogic with ADF Applications 12.2.1.2

If you try the newest version 12.2.1.2 (or maybe earlier versions too) you see, that your managed server does not restart, when

  • you have deployed your ADF application(s)
  • you try to restart the managed server with ADF
  • you use intentionally or not shared libraries in your weblogic-application.xml (see example below)
<?xml version = '1.0' encoding = 'UTF-8'?>
<weblogic-application xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
                      xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.bea.com/ns/weblogic/weblogic-application http://www.bea.com/ns/weblogic/weblogic-application/1.0/weblogic-application.xsd"
                      xmlns="http://www.bea.com/ns/weblogic/weblogic-application">
  <listener>
    <listener-class>oracle.adf.share.weblogic.listeners.ADFApplicationLifecycleListener</listener-class>
  </listener>
  <listener>
    <listener-class>oracle.mds.lcm.weblogic.WLLifecycleListener</listener-class>
  </listener>
  <library-ref>
    <library-name>adf.oracle.domain</library-name>
  </library-ref>
</weblogic-application>

You run into unpublished Bug 24490566: INTERMITTENT DEADLOCK IN WLS STARTUP DURING ADF-SHARE-DEPLOYED-TESTS.

But no problem, Oracle has created Patch 24490566: INTERMITTENT DEADLOCK IN WLS STARTUP DURING ADF-SHARE-DEPLOYED-TESTS for us for version 12.2.1.2.

Remember to install the patches for all of your developers too!

Remember too, if you want to install more than one patch, there can be conflicts. Please test carefully, if all of your problems are solved for all patches after adding one more patch. Maybe you have to create a merge request in Oracle My Support.

That’s it!

, , , , , ,

2 Comments

#DOAG2016 wrap up

doag_wegweiser

Another DOAG is over and here are my summary.

Day 1

Unfortunately the early train from duesseldorf arrives not before 9:30, so I missed the first morning slot. But on the other hand I this was the slot where I had to decide between 8 presentations, which I’m interested in.

The first soft skill presentation was about creative techniques beyond brain storming. The mentioned 3 techniques was all unknown for me, maybe I give it a try next time.

The next presentation promises a live demo of a forms 12c migration to production. Nothing really new here and remembers me for an “beautify our village” contest. But fairly enough for customers which absolutely want to remain on Oracle Forms. As Translation Hub 12c is not available and Oracle Reports 12c will be the last version, I think 11g will the last version we will use on our side before completing migration to ADF.

I attend two presentations, which shows Auraplayer on top of Oracle Forms to provide mobile applications via Oracle Mobile Cloud Service (MCS). I understand the MCS thing, although I find it very complicated to use. But put another layer on complicated and most slowly Oracle Forms to create web services for mobile applications seems no use case for me. I doubt that the recording of web services works really well for complicated forms which switch the displayed items and canvases depending on the selected data. All samples was very simple forms, but the response time of the resulting mobile app was not acceptable for me.

The presentation about continuous integration in APEX give me some new ideas for maybe replacing our actual deployment processes for PL/SQL in the future. Will have a look at the mentioned sql-maven-plugin, when we go for Maven for ADF too. Will check Rspec as BDD framework to run PL/SQL unit tests. Promising is the feature to tie together Selenium tests and data checks in the same Rspec test definition. One drop of bitterness remains, as the presenter had no idea how to solve a merge conflict. Seems that this was only a proof of concept and not really used daily there.

Best practices for PL/SQL performance was a good reminder, what I all know about this topic but use to seldom. But will use some of the configuration things like native compilation of the system packages or PL/SQL optimization level in my docker instances for automatic testing to optimize test times.

SQL tips and tricks was a sovereign presentation, but shows me again that for several Oracle database releases only little improvements for the developer comes with.

Day 2

In session “Standing at a Crossroads, ADF and JET” Duncan Mills clearly show the differences between Oracle ADF and Oracle JET. Running gag: The “Schnecke Chart” for quick decision between both. Will look, if I can reuse this for other decisions.

Next I tried an meeting at the Unconference about continuous integration for PL/SQL. But the most discussions really goes about the automation part. Most participants missed the most importantly definition of continuous integration: ” … continuous integration (CI) is the practice of merging all developer working copies to a shared mainline several times a day.”. Unfortunately I realize now that in the German Wikipedia translation this basis is completely softened: “developer should integrate as often as possible”. Not really new for me here, hope I have told something useful to the others.

“Extending Oracle ADF BC Models to REST, Cloud and Mobile” was a good time to remember what’s now possible as it really available and we now try another migration away from ADF 11g to the hottest version. I have seen this in the last conferences already.

Have read “Deep Dive Into Oracle ADF Transactions: Advanced Techniques” in the web already, but the information was a little bit clearer after seeing Eugene Fedorenko live.

Something completely different: “Free Load Testing Tools for Oracle Database”. I had known Swingbench before. SLOB is completely new for me and did not seen Apache JMeter JDBC test in this context before. Will test the last maybe in the future.

“Top 10 stumble stones for ADF 12c” was very technical but cool, good to have Markus Klenke at our site while our coming migration next weeks.

“Faster, Better, Cheaper: Oracle ADF Development in the Cloud” – with lot of problems in the demo part. Maybe really because of the DOAG WiFi. Quick Tip for all presenters: as I know at DOAG conferences there is ever an laptop available with LAN, try to put it in your laptop! For the content: DCS seems to restricting to much. I prefer Jenkins over Hudson. No push option directly with commit i JDeveloper etc.

Masking test data is very relevant in our banking busines, so I attend “Oracle Data Redaction live in Telko”. Seems that there are many fall knits here, as this doesn’t seem to solve all requirements out of the box.

Before the evening keynote Günter Stürner and Jürgen Menge was awarded, congratulations to both.

Following keynote “Hacking for managers” was very entertaining, if you are German then you should look on youtube for the presenter.

Now we are not ready for the evening party, we start the yearly German ADF Community meeting. Interesting part was a presentation of the Tools Statement of Direction, which again clearly differentiate between ADF, MAF, JET, MAX and ABCS. We get the clear statement ADF is standard for SAAS and JET for PAAS development at Oracle. In my opinion Oracle miss to communicate this in other presentations and miss to further present ADF in the public. A lot of questions of the present Community members was answered here too. Later we eat together with some of the product managers and community members and discussed topics for future presentations.

Later I go back to my hotel to remotely patch our fresh ADF 12.2.1.2 Server with patch for critical escalated bug to start our planned migration for ADF 11.1.1.5 next week. More later in a separate post.

Day 3

In “Indiana Nimphius und der JavaScript Tempel des Todes” Frank shows us his view on the JavaScript Universum, maybe we can really not avoid this in the future on some business cases. But for the next time we will stay on strongly supported ADF and will reduce JavaScript usage there to the minimum.

Thank god the roll-out of SQL Developer 4.1.5 is not started already in our company. Will look how fast I can add the free PLSQL/COP SQL Developer Plugin of Philip Salvisberg from Trivadis to the silent install process. He showed in “Fighting Bad PL/SQL” the theory and the practice how his static code analysis tool for PL/SQL does work. Depending on the outcome and the price maybe we will later implement in continuous integration.

The keynote “Big Picture of digital revolution” wakes the expectation to us to take responsibility for the effects of digital revolution to the society and makes me very thoughtful.

After our hopefully successful migration to ADF 12.2.1.2 I want to change our deployment from ANT to Maven, so I attend the presentation “Migration Maven Possibilities”. This gives a good reminder what to do at that point.

Very interesting presentation, which really does not deserves so few visitors, was “Home Lab Setup and Familiarization of E-Business R12.2”. My time with E-Business Suite is over 15 years away, so I was surprised that I recognized much of the components. I think I’m sure not to install E-Business Suite for the moment, but lot of the instructions for the Home Lab Setup could I reuse for other technologies. Some concepts for the E-Business Suite, eg. double filesystem for reducing offline time for patching, are very interesting.

With last 2 presentations I enter again the world of ThickDatabase paradigm. We ever know that executing business in the database seems faster as in the middle tier, but we had no proofs. Now Toon Koppelaars from Oracle itself give us this with a deep analysis. The question remains – will the other Oracle departments will learn from this?

day 4

Tomorrow I will be trained in Continuous Delivery with Oracle Fusion Middleware and Oracle Cloud. I will release another blogs, when implementing some findings from this training.

conclusion

As you see I switch often between technologies. This happens not ever voluntary. Normally I interested more in the development like ADF, MAF and JET. This year these presentation are unfortunately distributed over the conference. So I have discussed this today with the DOAG executives, they will improve this next year.

Nevertheless I get a lot of ideas from presentations in technologies I do not or not regularly use, so sometime I intentionally choose from such interesting presentations.

A recommendation for all conference visitors. Read the abstracts before you go to a conference and maybe before you book! You avoid disappointments because of wrong expectations. Often the title has the only purpose to be accept the presentation and has little to do with the real content. Abstracts give you often a better idea about the content.

That’s it!

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Virtual Development Server: Provide Docker images in docker registry for Oracle XE Database and others

For later creation of containers as needed in the deployment process we have first to build docker images whenever we do not find suitable one in docker hub.

For most of my development I need a oracle database. On the internet you can find a lot of Dockerfile’s for this, but no ready image. This is because for running a database you have to accept a license and this happens when you download the installation software. For private testing this license often is free.

The basic cycle for all of this images is the same on my side:

  1. Find a Docker image
  2. If not found download required Software and build a Docker image
  3. Build the Docker image
  4. Push the images to private docker registry or the public registry DockerHub

Fortunately Oracle provides recently on GitHub a lot of working Dockerfile’s for building different product images. The creator Gerald Venzl desribes in this blog how to create an Oracle EE image.

Following you find an example for building Oracle XE 11.2.0.2 Image.

First you have to clone the git repository to a directory of you choice, I choose C:\shared\scmlocal\docker-images.
Put the downloaded installation source oracle-xe-11.2.0-1.0.x86_64.rpm.zip in the subdirectory C:\shared\scmlocal\docker-images\OracleDatabase\dockerfiles\11.2.0.2 as described in GitHub.
Next we have to map this directory to our virtualbox via following vagrant instructions. Additional we prepare port forwarding for accessing later the database from our host system.

...
  # Port Forwardings for:
  # - Oracle database port
  config.vm.network "forwarded_port", guest: 1521, host: 1521
  # Oracle Application Express (APEX)
  config.vm.network "forwarded_port", guest: 8080, host: 8080
...
  # map Oracle Docker Images installation path
  config.vm.synced_folder "C:\\shared\\scmlocal\\docker-images", "/docker-images", :mount_options => ["dmode=777","fmode=777"]
...

After that restart the virtualbox and connect to it via

vagrant halt
vagrant up
vagrant ssh

In the output you can see this mapping.

...
    default: 1521 (guest) => 1521 (host) (adapter 1)
    default: 5000 (guest) => 5000 (host) (adapter 1)
    default: 8080 (guest) => 8080 (host) (adapter 1)
...
    default: /docker-images => C:/shared/scmlocal/docker-images
...

Now you create build the image with the Oracle XE (-x) database version (-v) 11.2.0.2 via the provided scripts from oracle. -i skips the MD5 checksum check, as the checksums are not checked in as UNIX text format and so does not work in our vagrant on windows / oel virtualbox combination.

cd /docker-images/OracleDatabase/dockerfiles
./buildDockerImage.sh -v 11.2.0.2 -x -i

Now you have to wait some time. When the process is ready, you get at the time of this writing an image with the binaries installed.

docker images
REPOSITORY          TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED              SIZE
oracle/database     11.2.0.2-xe         624d78c89ccb        About a minute ago   1.203 GB
registry            latest              c6c14b3960bd        5 weeks ago          33.28 MB
oraclelinux         latest              1988eb5b3fc6        6 weeks ago          278.2 MB

Next we tag this image for pushing to the local docker repository, which we have created in the first blog of this series and is up with every vagrant up of our virtualbox. After that we push it to the registry.

docker tag oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe localhost:5000/oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe
docker push localhost:5000/oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe

In the output we see the succesful push.

The push refers to a repository [localhost:5000/oracle/database]
345dfbce8859: Pushed
dd4b46d40894: Pushed
11327e04fac0: Pushed
11.2.0.2-xe: digest: sha256:82058ca2c5c201ff46471a8db4d9569da9869d420727595884050f94dad0ec85 size: 955

Now we will check, if we can create a Docker container from our image in the registry and the database is working in it. Therefore at first we delete the oracle/database and oraclelinux images from our virtualbox. Then we create the container.

docker rmi 624d78c89ccb -f
docker rmi 1988eb5b3fc6
sudo docker run --shm-size=1g -p 1521:1521 -p 8080:8080 --name="db11.2.0.2-xe" --restart unless-stopped localhost:5000/oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe

In line 3 we pull the image from the local registry, start a container, open the ports 1521 and 8080 to the virtualbox and give the container a name.

Unable to find image 'localhost:5000/oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe' locally
11.2.0.2-xe: Pulling from oracle/database

10ec637c060c: Pull complete
1902f66bc90b: Pull complete
dd8942200fe1: Pull complete
Digest: sha256:41ce1015c8f68ce063e855e7afa96000ededeef1e197e2181bc04c9577d73a1b
Status: Downloaded newer image for localhost:5000/oracle/database:11.2.0.2-xe
ORACLE AUTO GENERATED PASSWORD FOR SYS AND SYSTEM: 9f4e9a733e7983bc

Oracle Database 11g Express Edition Configuration
-------------------------------------------------
This will configure on-boot properties of Oracle Database 11g Express
Edition.  The following questions will determine whether the database should
be starting upon system boot, the ports it will use, and the passwords that
will be used for database accounts.  Press <Enter> to accept the defaults.
Ctrl-C will abort.

Specify the HTTP port that will be used for Oracle Application Express [8080]:
Specify a port that will be used for the database listener [1521]:
Specify a password to be used for database accounts.  Note that the same
password will be used for SYS and SYSTEM.  Oracle recommends the use of
different passwords for each database account.  This can be done after
initial configuration:
Confirm the password:

Do you want Oracle Database 11g Express Edition to be started on boot (y/n) [y]:
Starting Oracle Net Listener...Done
Configuring database...Done
Starting Oracle Database 11g Express Edition instance...Done
Installation completed successfully.

SQL*Plus: Release 11.2.0.2.0 Production on Tue Sep 6 09:41:22 2016

Copyright (c) 1982, 2011, Oracle.  All rights reserved.

Connected to:
Oracle Database 11g Express Edition Release 11.2.0.2.0 - 64bit Production

SQL>
PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> Disconnected from Oracle Database 11g Express Edition Release 11.2.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
#########################
DATABASE IS READY TO USE!
#########################
db_recovery_file_dest_size of 10240 MB is 0.98% used. This is a
user-specified limit on the amount of space that will be used by this
database for recovery-related files, and does not reflect the amount of
space available in the underlying filesystem or ASM diskgroup.
Starting background process CJQ0
Tue Sep 06 09:41:19 2016
CJQ0 started with pid=26, OS id=759
Tue Sep 06 09:41:24 2016
XDB installed.
XDB initialized.

In line 9 you can see the autogenerated passwords.
When line 46 appears, you can connect to the database.
With following command you can change the passwords of SYS and SYSTEM:

sudo docker exec db11.2.0.2-xe /u01/app/oracle/setPassword.sh LetsDocker

You see following output:

SQL*Plus: Release 11.2.0.2.0 Production on Tue Sep 6 15:49:34 2016
Copyright (c) 1982, 2011, Oracle.  All rights reserved.
Connected to:
Oracle Database 11g Express Edition Release 11.2.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
SQL>
User altered.
SQL>
User altered.

As long as you not remove or manually stop the container, it restarts with the virtualbox now via:

vagrant halt
vagrant up

At the moment you cannot make your database instance data persistent for this container, I have opened an issue for this, but Gerald Venzl has promised to to implement this later.

Here you find the source code for this blog.

Here you find more about the topic “Virtual Development Server”.

That’s it.

References:

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment

Set all WebLogic log levels to “Inherit” via WLST

Logging is a very useful feature of WebLogic.

Unfortunately the log levels, which are set after a clean install of WebLogic or some of the Fusion Middleware product creates a lot of noise and therefore it costs I/O performance.

Additional after analyzing an issue with logging often resetting the log level is forgotten.

Here you get a script to reset the log levels at regular intervals or after a trace session.

#!/usr/bin/python
execfile('get_environment.py')
connect(wlUser, wlPassword, wlAdminUrl)
edit()
loggers = listLoggers(target=managedServer, runtime=0)
for key, value in loggers.items():
  if key <> "" and key <> "ADF_PERFORMANCE_MONITOR_DATABASE" and value <> "":
    print "set " + key + " from " + value + " to <Inherited>"
    setLogLevel(target=managedServer, runtime=0, logger=key, level="")
loggers = listLoggers(target=managedServer, runtime=0)
exit()

In line 2 a script is called to initialize your environment variables wlUser, wlPassword, wlAdminUrl and managedServer.
In line 5 you get the list of loggers.
In line 6..9 you iterate over this list.
In line 7 you can add your own restrictions. Here are already filtered all inherited loggers and one special tool logger for performance monitoring of ADF applications.
In line 10 the loggers are shown again for the result, you can remove this.

Now call this script via

$ORACLE_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin/wlst.sh config_loglevel.py

In the output you see similar output:

------------------------------------------------------------------------+-----------------
Logger                                                                  | Level
------------------------------------------------------------------------+-----------------
...
oracle.ods.virtualization.accesslog                                     | ERROR:1
...
set oracle.ods.virtualization.accesslog from ERROR:1 to <Inherited>

------------------------------------------------------------------------+-----------------
Logger                                                                  | Level
------------------------------------------------------------------------+-----------------
...
oracle.ods.virtualization.accesslog                                     | <Inherited>
...

This version of the script change only the persistent logger levels (runtime=0), because we don’t want influence running trace sessions. But as our servers are dayly started, all runtime log levels are resetted at this point to the persistent one’s.

That’s it.

References:

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Virtual Development Server: Add swapfile to VirtualBox as requirement for installing Oracle or build Oracle docker images

As I want later build Oracle docker images, some of this need a swapfile.

Per default my used Vagrantbox, does not have one, so later steps will fail.

As in the last blog I use a Vagrant shell provider.

...
  # add swapfile to the box
  config.vm.provision :shell, :path => "add_swap.sh"
...

This calls the script add_swap.sh in the created VirtualBox machine.
Make sure, that you create your swapfile on a supported file system.

#!/bin/sh

# size of swapfile in megabytes
swapsize=2100

# does the swap file already exist?
grep -q "swapfile" /etc/fstab

# if not then create it
if [ $? -ne 0 ]; then
  echo 'swapfile not found. Adding swapfile.'
  # allocate the disk space
  sudo fallocate -l ${swapsize}M /home/swapfile
  # only owner can read and write
  sudo chmod 600 /home/swapfile
  # sets up swap area in the file
  sudo mkswap /home/swapfile
  # enable file for paging and swapping
  # if this comes with "swapon failed: Invalid argument",
  # check if the filesystem is supported for swap, xfs eg. is not
  sudo swapon /home/swapfile
  # mount the swapfile at boot
  echo '/home/swapfile none swap defaults 0 0' >> /etc/fstab
else
  echo 'swapfile found. No changes made.'
fi

# output results to terminal
df -h /home/swapfile
cat /proc/swaps
cat /proc/meminfo | grep Swap

Now you have to recreate the VirtualBox machine via

vagrant destroy
vagrant up

In the output you can now see, how the swapfile is added.

...
==> default: Running provisioner: shell...
    default: Running: C:/Users/torst/AppData/Local/Temp/vagrant-shell20160819-14324-1a10xs8.sh
==> default: swapfile not found. Adding swapfile.
==> default: Setting up swapspace version 1, size = 2150396 KiB
==> default: no label, UUID=20ff8dbf-6282-4ba6-abe4-05c04c74aac8
==> default: Filesystem              Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
==> default: /dev/mapper/linux-home  3.8G  2.4G  1.5G  63% /home
==> default: Filename                           Type            Size    Used    Priority
==> default: /home/swapfile                          file               2150396 0       -1
==> default: SwapCached:            0 kB
==> default: SwapTotal:       2150396 kB
==> default: SwapFree:        2150396 kB
...

Here you find the source code for this blog.

Here you find more about the topic “Virtual Development Server”.

That’s it.

References:

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Virtual Development Server: Add enough ram and disk space to VirtualBox for further server components

As I want later build docker images and run docker containers I have to provide enough disk space for this.

Per default the Vagrantboxes have vmdk disks, these have a static size and are to small for my purposes.

Therefore I convert the disk, which comes with the box, via Vagrant VirtualBox provider from vmdk to vdi, so that it allocate only the used disk space in the host system.
Additional I add a second big disk:

...
  # virtualbox provider
  config.vm.provider "virtualbox" do |vb|
    # name in VirtualBox
    vb.name = "Development Server"

    # configure 16 GB memory
    vb.customize ["modifyvm", :id, "--memory", "16384"]

    # clone the original vmdk disk into a dynamic vdi disk, which only allocate the used space on the host
    if ARGV[0] == "up" && ! File.exist?("#{ENV["HOME"]}/VirtualBox VMs/#{vb.name}/#{vb.name}.vdi")
      # configure the SATA controller for second disk port, for other box you may have another controller
      vb.customize [
        "storagectl", :id,
        "--name", "SATA",
        "--controller", "IntelAHCI",
        "--portcount", "1",
        "--hostiocache", "on"
      ]
      # clone the original disk, for other box you may have another disk name
      vb.customize [
        "clonehd", "#{ENV["HOME"]}/VirtualBox VMs/#{vb.name}/box-disk2.vmdk",
             "#{ENV["HOME"]}/VirtualBox VMs/#{vb.name}/#{vb.name}.vdi",
        "--format", "VDI"
      ]
      # attach the cloned disk to the controller
      vb.customize [
        "storageattach", :id,
        "--storagectl", "SATA",
        "--port", "0",
        "--device", "0",
        "--type", "hdd",
        "--nonrotational", "on",
        "--medium", "#{ENV["HOME"]}/VirtualBox VMs/#{vb.name}/#{vb.name}.vdi"
      ]
      # delete the original disk to release it's space
      vb.customize [
        "closemedium", "disk", "#{ENV["HOME"]}/VirtualBox VMs/#{vb.name}/box-disk2.vmdk",
        "--delete"
      ]
    end

    # create addtional big dynamic vdi disk for docker images
    if !File.exist?("#{ENV["HOME"]}/VirtualBox VMs/#{vb.name}/#{vb.name}_docker.vdi")
      # create addtional big dynamic vdi (200 GB)
      vb.customize [
        "createhd",
        "--filename", "#{ENV["HOME"]}/VirtualBox VMs/#{vb.name}/#{vb.name}_docker.vdi",
        "--format", "VDI",
        "--size", 200 * 1024
      ]
      # attach the addtional disk to the controller
      vb.customize [
        "storageattach", :id,
        "--storagectl", "SATA",
        "--port", "1",
        "--device", 0,
        "--type", "hdd",
        "--medium", "#{ENV["HOME"]}/VirtualBox VMs/#{vb.name}/#{vb.name}_docker.vdi"
      ]
    end
  end

  # shell provider
  # format the additional disk and add the free space to the box
  config.vm.provision :shell, :path => "add_disk.sh"
  ...

Lines 64..66 adds the additional disk space to a logical volume via a Vagrant shell provider, which calls the script add_disk.sh in the created VirtualBox machine.
Resizing the first disk does not work, as therefore the machine has to be booted, which cannot be handled with Vagrant.

# exit immediately if a command exits with a non-zero status.
set -e
# activate debugging from here
set -x

if [ -f /etc/disk_added_date ] ; then
   echo "disk already added so exiting."
   exit 0
fi

# show diskspace of the logical volume before adding the disk
df -h /dev/mapper/linux-root

# partitioning the disk
sudo fdisk -u /dev/sdb <<EOF n p t 8e w EOF # initialize the partition for use by logical volume manager sudo pvcreate /dev/sdb1 # add the partition to volume group linux sudo vgextend linux /dev/sdb1 # increase the size of the logical volume /dev/mapper/linux-root sudo lvextend --extents +51199 --resizefs /dev/mapper/linux-root # mark that the disk was added date > /etc/disk_added_date

# show diskspace of the logical volume after adding the disk
df -h /dev/mapper/linux-root

Now you have to recreate the VirtualBox machine via

vagrant destroy
vagrant up

In the output you can now see, how the logical volume grows:

==> default: Running provisioner: shell...
    default: Running: C:/Users/torst/AppData/Local/Temp/vagrant-shell20160812-2348-1ln6wrz.sh
==> default: ++ '[' -f /etc/disk_added_date ']'
==> default: ++ df -h /dev/mapper/linux-root
==> default: Filesystem              Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
==> default: /dev/mapper/linux-root   16G  1.9G   14G  12% /
==> default: ++ sudo fdisk -u /dev/sdb
==> default: Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.23.2).
==> default:
==> default: Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
==> default: Be careful before using the write command.
==> default:
==> default:
==> default: Command (m for help): Partition type:
==> default:    p   primary (0 primary, 0 extended, 4 free)
==> default:    e   extended
==> default: Select (default p): Partition number (1-4, default 1): First sector (2048-419430399, default 2048): Using default value 2048
==> default: Last sector, +sectors or +size{K,M,G} (2048-419430399, default 419430399): Using default value 419430399
==> default: Partition 1 of type Linux and of size 200 GiB is set
==> default:
==> default: Command (m for help): Selected partition 1
==> default: Hex code (type L to list all codes): Hex code (type L to list all codes): Changed type of partition 'Linux' to 'Linux LVM'
==> default:
==> default: Command (m for help):
==> default: Device does not contain a recognized partition table
==> default: Building a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0xb4c74c64.
==> default: The partition table has been altered!
==> default:
==> default: Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
==> default: Syncing disks.
==> default: ++ sudo pvcreate /dev/sdb1
==> default:   Physical volume "/dev/sdb1" successfully created
==> default: ++ sudo vgextend linux /dev/sdb1
==> default:   Volume group "linux" successfully extended
==> default: ++ sudo lvextend --extents +51199 --resizefs /dev/mapper/linux-root
==> default:   Size of logical volume linux/root changed from 15.62 GiB (4000 extents) to 215.62 GiB (55199 extents).
==> default:   Logical volume root successfully resized.
==> default: meta-data=/dev/mapper/linux-root isize=256    agcount=4, agsize=1024000 blks
==> default:          =                       sectsz=512   attr=2, projid32bit=1
==> default:          =                       crc=0        finobt=0
==> default: data     =                       bsize=4096   blocks=4096000, imaxpct=25
==> default:          =                       sunit=0      swidth=0 blks
==> default: naming   =version 2              bsize=4096   ascii-ci=0 ftype=0
==> default: log      =internal               bsize=4096   blocks=2560, version=2
==> default:          =                       sectsz=512   sunit=0 blks, lazy-count=1
==> default: realtime =none                   extsz=4096   blocks=0, rtextents=0
==> default: data blocks changed from 4096000 to 56523776
==> default: ++ date
==> default: ++ df -h /dev/mapper/linux-root
==> default: Filesystem              Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
==> default: /dev/mapper/linux-root  216G  1.9G  214G   1% /

Here you find the source code for this blog.

Here you find more about the topic “Virtual Development Server”.

That’s it.

References:

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Virtual Development Server: Creating Virtualbox machine including docker containers with Vagrant

As I want to decouple my development server from my computer as much as possible I want to create first a virtual machine with linux.

Because I have used Oracle Virtualbox in the past successfully, I will use it here too.

As I want have later a reproducible environment via Infrastructure as code, I give Vagrant a try for this. As source code management system I use GIT, my remote repository is located at GitHub.

As I don’t want create a new linux from scratch, I have looked for a ready system at Vagrantboxes, which contains a new Oracle Linux version, and find a Oracle Linux 7.1 x86_64 system with Chef and Puppet preinstalled.

Before I could start, I had to install on my Windows 10 computer Vagrant 1.8.5 and Oracle Virtualbox 5.0.16. Don’t use the 5.1 Version, as at this is not yet supported by vagrant 1.8.5.

For automatic update of the Oracle VM VirtualBox Extension Pack, which is delivered with the ready box and is required for use of shared folders and more, you should install following plugin as described here:

vagrant plugin install vagrant vbguest

Next I have created a directory of your choice and init there a Vagrantfile by calling

vagrant init

Then I changed the Vagrantfile as following, see the inline comments for documentation:

Vagrant.configure(2) do |config|

  # Use the mentioned ready OEL 7 linux box
  config.vm.box = "oraclelinux-7-x86_64.box"
  config.vm.box_url = "http://cloud.terry.im/vagrant/oraclelinux-7-x86_64.box"

  # Create a private network
  config.vm.network "private_network", type: "dhcp"

  # persistant storage for all docker container
  config.vm.synced_folder "C:\\shared\\virtual_storage", "/virtual_storage", :mount_options => ["dmode=777","fmode=777"]

  # virtualbox provider
  config.vm.provider "virtualbox" do |vb|
    # name in VirtualBox
    vb.name = "Development Server"
	end

  # Docker Private Registry container for storing later builded docker images, which are not in the Docker Public Registry at https://hub.docker.com/
  config.vm.provision "docker" do |d|
    d.run "registry", image: "registry", daemonize: true, args: "-d -p 5000:5000 -v /virtual_storage/docker_registry:/var/lib/registry"
  end

end

Run next from the created directory

vagrant up

Following you see the output

Bringing machine 'default' up with 'virtualbox' provider...
==> default: Importing base box 'oraclelinux-7-x86_64.box'...
==> default: Matching MAC address for NAT networking...
==> default: Setting the name of the VM: Development Server
==> default: Clearing any previously set network interfaces...
==> default: Preparing network interfaces based on configuration...
    default: Adapter 1: nat
    default: Adapter 2: hostonly
==> default: Forwarding ports...
    default: 22 (guest) => 2222 (host) (adapter 1)
==> default: Booting VM...
==> default: Waiting for machine to boot. This may take a few minutes...
    default: SSH address: 127.0.0.1:2222
    default: SSH username: vagrant
    default: SSH auth method: private key
    default: Warning: Remote connection disconnect. Retrying...
    default:
    default: Vagrant insecure key detected. Vagrant will automatically replace
    default: this with a newly generated keypair for better security.
    default:
    default: Inserting generated public key within guest...
    default: Removing insecure key from the guest if it's present...
    default: Key inserted! Disconnecting and reconnecting using new SSH key...
==> default: Machine booted and ready!
[default] GuestAdditions versions on your host (5.0.26) and guest (5.0.12) do not match.
Loaded plugins: ulninfo
Package kernel-uek-devel-4.1.12-32.el7uek.x86_64 already installed and latest version
Package gcc-4.8.5-4.el7.x86_64 already installed and latest version
Package 1:make-3.82-21.el7.x86_64 already installed and latest version
Package 4:perl-5.16.3-286.el7.x86_64 already installed and latest version
Package bzip2-1.0.6-13.el7.x86_64 already installed and latest version
Nothing to do
Copy iso file C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox\VBoxGuestAdditions.iso into the box /tmp/VBoxGuestAdditions.iso
mount: /dev/loop0 is write-protected, mounting read-only
Installing Virtualbox Guest Additions 5.0.26 - guest version is 5.0.12
Verifying archive integrity... All good.
Uncompressing VirtualBox 5.0.26 Guest Additions for Linux............
VirtualBox Guest Additions installer
Removing installed version 5.0.12 of VirtualBox Guest Additions...
Removing existing VirtualBox non-DKMS kernel modules[  OK  ]
Copying additional installer modules ...
Installing additional modules ...
Removing existing VirtualBox non-DKMS kernel modules[  OK  ]
Building the VirtualBox Guest Additions kernel modules
Building the main Guest Additions module[  OK  ]
Building the shared folder support module[  OK  ]
Building the shared folder support module[  OK  ]
Building the graphics driver module[  OK  ]
Doing non-kernel setup of the Guest Additions[  OK  ]
You should restart your guest to make sure the new modules are actually used

==> default: Checking for guest additions in VM...
==> default: Configuring and enabling network interfaces...
==> default: Mounting shared folders...
    default: /vagrant => C:/shared/scmlocal/blog
    default: /virtual_storage => C:/shared/virtual_storage
==> default: Running provisioner: docker...
    default: Installing Docker onto machine...
==> default: Starting Docker containers...
==> default: -- Container: registry

In lines 1..24 you see the loading of the ready box and booting with the defined network
In lines 25..50 the version of the VirtualBox GuestAdditions of the box is checked and after that replaced with the actual installed VirtualBox version. This happens only on the first “vagrant up” call.
In lines 57..58 Docker is installed as a Vagrant Docker provider is called in the Vagrantfile line 20 and it does not exist in the box before.
In lines 59..60 a Docker Private Registry container is started via loading docker image from the Docker Public Registry. In a later blog we will use this Docker Private Registry container to hold our own created docker images like database and development tools. The pushed images are saved to a mapped host volume of my windows 10 computer.

You can connect to the virtualbox directly via

vagrant ssh

The you can see the downloaded Docker Private Registry images and the started container from this image:

[vagrant@oraclelinux7 ~]$ docker images
REPOSITORY          TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
registry            latest              c6c14b3960bd        13 days ago         33.28 MB
[vagrant@oraclelinux7 ~]$ docker ps
CONTAINER ID        IMAGE               COMMAND                  CREATED             STATUS              PORTS                    NAMES
739c1c9926b1        registry            "/entrypoint.sh /etc/"   5 minutes ago       Up 5 minutes        0.0.0.0:5000->5000/tcp   registry

You can now stop the Development Server via

vagrant halt

If you startup again the server via

vagrant up

the provision steps are not replayed until you destroy the server or explicitly call the provision again via

vagrant provision

Here you find the source code for this blog.

Here you find more about the topic “Virtual Development Server”.

That’s it.

, , , , , , , ,

1 Comment

Virtual Development Server: The idea

For long time I had the idea to create a virtual development server for testing some ideas and play with some new and old technologies.

The several components should be easy replaceable and should influence my computer as little as possible.

So in the next blogs of this series I will discuss several technologies like vagrant, docker, jenkins and several oracle database and development stacks.

Here you find more about the topic “Virtual Development Server”.

Please stay tuned!

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: